Where’s the Ending? Completing Your Story

Part 7 of The Fan Fiction Experiment

There was no ‘One, two, three, and away,’ but they began running when they liked, and left off when they liked, so that it was not easy to know when the race was over. However, when they had been running half an hour or so, and were quite dry again, the Dodo suddenly called out ‘The race is over!’ and they all crowded round it, panting, and asking, ‘But who has won?’

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Dodo from Alice's Adventures in Wonderland
Dodo from Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

One of the most difficult and annoying issues that plagues writers—and readers!—on free online writing sites is the inability to complete the story. There are tons of incomplete works of fanfiction, along with furious readers and apologetic writers. Let’s face it, writers can lose impetus, especially when there isn’t any monetary motivation involved. Plus, waning interest and plot bunnies come complimentary with storytelling genius. Many writers cater to them, leaping to a different tale without rescuing poor Sheila, the Little Mermaid’s sister, from the clutches of Korth, King Triton’s evil twin. Readers want writers to be reliable.

Johannes Vermeer - Lady Writing a Letter with ...
Johannes Vermeer – Lady Writing a Letter with Her Maid (detail) – WGA24698 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

It’s not easy to be a steady serial chapter writer. It’s even harder to finish the story. Diligence is a muscle a writer has to exercise. Sense and Sensibility was originally written as a series of letters and read to the family. Think about that: It’s probable we wouldn’t have Elinor and Marianne and their beautiful love stories if not for the support of Jane Austen’s family to keep her writing. Unfortunately, not everyone has a family like Jane’s.

Fanfiction sites can help you stay accountable, motivated, and focused while writing your story. Every writer craves encouraging reviews, but they won’t keep a story going if the writer doesn’t have a purpose for continuing. So, begin with a purpose statement. ‘What?’ you might say, ‘Can’t a writer just write for the fun of it, to free one’s adventuresome spirit?’ Actually, a writer always has a purpose statement because no one writes without a reason. Some purpose statements include: “I want to try a ghost story,” “I want to explore a political theory of mine,” “I want to exorcise a harsh time from my past,” “My teacher says I have to write this,” or “I want to see how much of this story I can complete if I make a goal of posting two chapters a week.”

When beginning a story, writing down my purpose statement is like insuring my work. It’s my fallback. Without it, my story can become like a game of Telephone; I start with one idea and the story mimics flypaper, gathering plot bunny carcasses until I can’t find the original idea at all.

Here’s an example of a purpose statement:

I am writing Backwash, My First Job at a Dentist’s Office because I need closure on this most disgusting experience in my life, and I need to defend my decision to brush my teeth fourteen times a day.

I try to be as descriptive as I can. If I’m writing to a specific person or audience, I include that as well. This helps me refocus on the reason for writing the story, should I get sidetracked, say, by deciding to change the plot midway through. (Fanfic reviewers can have very tempting ideas, by the way. It is easy to get sidetracked, especially once a writer begins to receive good feedback.)

It’s just something to consider if your original reason for writing is important to you to stick to. Changing the story to accommodate a different purpose isn’t necessarily bad, but changing your motivation can change your work. It can also usher in a bad case of writer’s block.

There’s a general consensus that J.K. Rowling wrote Deathly Hallows with her fans in mind because there are nods in the 7th Harry Potter book, and it reads differently from the giddy, sky’s-the-limit feel of The Sorcerer’s Stone. After reading book seven, my sister and I discussed our theories on how the book would have differed without the influence of Potter fans everywhere. We’ll never know.

English: Cropped version of File:Lucy_Maud_Mon...
English: Cropped version of File:Lucy_Maud_Montgomery.JPG (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

L.M. Montgomery, the author of Anne of Green Gables, wrote the other books in the Anne series after there was a demand for more. The rest of the stories in the series are great, but it is my opinion that there is something very precious and delightful when you first meet Anne that you don’t find in the rest of the books. Did this affect the sales of these books? I doubt it.

To clarify, your purpose statement is not the premise or the story outline, which are excellent ways to keep a writer focused, too. Some writers work best when following a premise or outline, while other writers like to wing it; but all of us have a purpose when we first begin writing the story, be it simple or complex.

Monday’s post will be about fails at originality. And next Friday’s post will be the last in the series.

(Disclaimer: Something about opinions and experiences. Writing this post distracted me, and I forgot to write it down.)

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Author: Rilla Z

I'm a scribbler. I write about this world, the worlds inside my head, and the world to come.

4 thoughts on “Where’s the Ending? Completing Your Story”

  1. Writing a story online is a challenge! I didn’t go the fan fiction route, but I’m closing in on the finish of the second of my Meghan Bode mysteries. It’s a great exercise in diligence and testing how serious we are about writing complete stories, not just flitting from idea to idea.

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  2. The ending is always difficult for me, but so are the beginning and middle. I’m kind of glad I am not “driven” to write. No pressure. Just when I feel like it.

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    1. Sometimes I’m envious of those who don’t feel that pressure. I’m not sure if it comes from the writer in me or because my personality likes closure to projects.

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