10 of my Favorite Fictitious Characters

Here are some of the book, movie, and television characters I grew up loving.

By New York : Broadway Music, publisher. [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
1. Anne Shirley, “I wouldn’t want to marry anybody who was wicked, but I think I’d like it if he could be wicked and wouldn’t.” – Anne of the Island by L. M. Montgomery

2. Lady Catherine DeBourgh, “I’m very attentive to all of those things.” – Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen

3. The Childlike Empress, “They were with him when he hid from the boys in the bookstore…” – The NeverEnding Story

4. Mary Musgrove, “You, who have not a mother’s feelings, are a great deal the properest person.” – Persuasion by Jane Austen

5. Nikky, “I can’t think of a lovelier way of spending my life than spinning that silver light.” – The Moon-Spinners

6. Jamie Graham, (“Would you like a Hershey bar?”) “Yes, please.” (“So would I, kid. Have you got one?”) – Empire of the Sun

By FOX 52 (Sitcoms Online “The Cosby Show”) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
7. Claire Huxtable, “We are very fortunate to have the children, Cliff. Otherwise, we would never know the joy of leaving them at home.” – The Cosby Show

8. Mary Poppins, “Enough is as good as a feast” – Mary Poppins

9. Ralphie, “Don’t bother me. I’m—I’m thinking.” – A Christmas Story

10. The Sick Grandson, “Is this a kissing book?” – The Princess Bride

Advertisements

When I Meet the Bad Guy

Some time ago I read a draft of a story written in the point of view of the villain. Let me say upfront that I was entirely judging this character to be in the wrong, and I wanted to explore the character’s actions. I wanted to consider the story from her perspective.

The author began with an objective voice. It was great…for the first few paragraphs. Then something happened and my interest waned. I closed the book. Later, I asked myself, “Where did that story go wrong? It started out promising!”

It doesn’t matter which character’s eyes I’m seeing the story through; for a bad guy to be, well, good, I need some questions answered.

1. When I meet Cruel Bob, I will ask him,

“What’s Your Last Name?”

There’s a scene in the movie Galaxy Quest where the guy, named Guy, knows he’s going to die because he has no last name. He panics because he has no hobbies, no love interest, no back story, nothing. He knows he’ll be the first to go. As Captain James Hook would say, this is “bad form” for any villain who is going to be around for a while.

Leroux’s Phantom was given great context, both in the revelation of his past and in his residence under the Opera House. [Scan of still of Lon Chaney in The Phantom of the Opera (1925) ([1]) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons]
Cruel Bob’s a cardboard character (aka, the two-dimensional chump) who needs context, or he won’t matter to me. I want to know his temperament, his tendencies, his surroundings–anything that will help me understand who he is right when I meet him. I want to relate to him, if only to roundly hate him.

Even a drunken, violent character has his times when I can see the struggling person inside. The manipulative liar has his weak moments, when I see his doubts creep in. He’s still the bad guy, but a bad guy with a human element.

2. I will ask that devious Madame Vitriol,

“What’s Your Problem?”

In real life, it would be much easier if people would go around with “bad guy” and “good guy” signs, but in reality everyone chooses what he/she will be. They have a past and a reason for doing what they do. It’s often the motivation from their past that helped create their present path. We all have a motive. What is the catalyst for your baddie’s behavior?

The scene where Willoughby cuts off a lock of Marianne’s hair. John Willoughby was by nature a man moved by the moment, and by nurture he could afford to live recklessly. [By Hugh Thomson. (A scan from the book Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons]
For a writer, motives become characters in themselves. A trickster can make a bad motive look like it’s good, and, sometimes, even a character with a good motive can behave in a bad way. So, tell me about those interesting events early on in Madame’s life that changed her. This helps me to better understand her and want to keep reading.

3. Then I will ask Mr. Eville von Furioso,

“Do You Come With Commentary?”

There are characters who are clearly wrong in what they do and think, but an author who uses the narrative to harp on this is really doing the reader a disservice. The story I mentioned at the beginning of the post is a good example. The author didn’t keep the objectivism. The emotion welled up before my eyes as the lines progressed. At first, the character waited patiently, set things in order, considered the merits of her work, etc. Then the phrases and words changed. Her ‘lip curled in disgust,’ she ‘ordered,’ and she ‘demanded.’ The author’s perspective took over the story.

I don’t want to be told your baddie is cruel, manipulative, delusional, misguided, or fiendish. This isn’t persuading me, it’s hitting me over the head with a thick Board of Obvious. What if each book drew a bright highlighter through the bad guy’s every action by using adjectives with negative connotations? What if each encounter with that character was weighted down with biased phrases? A good story should give me the pieces to help me draw that conclusion for myself.

In life I have to exercise my critical thinking skills to protect myself because the world has some people who are not nice living in it. Those who have the greatest influence on the way I think are the ones I’ve come to know personally. When I meet a real, living mean person, who is sometimes warmly sympathetic and sometimes cold and heartless, I have to learn to see past emotions and realize when that person is doing something wrong.

The book characters who mimic real-life people are the ones with whom I become emotionally attached. Mr. von F can’t resonate if he comes with the author’s complimentary “view my character this way” specs. I won’t remember him. So, please, leave the Board of Obvious at home and help me work my way through Eville’s schemes organically.

Being a fan of the character-based novel, I’m looking for a good bad guy. He/She must have (1) Context, (2) Motive, and (3) No Complimentary Commentary. I’m not saying the world would be a better place if authors did this, but I can think of a few books that would be better books.

Tackle the Task

Shhh! Guess who’s school librarian this year? Great Dewey decimals, I am! Think small school, small number of books… I should have this in the bag, right?

By Michael Holley Swtpc6800 (Own work) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

I have a tendency to overthink the simple task. My mind is chock full of ideas, most of which are, well, blown out of proportion. If you asked me how to paint a tall building, my first thought would be to use a hot air balloon. A fascinating visual, yes, but it doesn’t work.

There are four ways I check my overactive imagination:

I ask God to help me.

God should be my first line of offense, not just defense. He happens to be in charge of the universe, which means he has an incredible way of dropping things into my lap right when I need them. (Does He do that for you, too? It’s nice, isn’t it?) I find out a friend I’ve known for years knows all about a subject or skill that helps me solve my dilemma. A complete stranger walks up and gives me the piece to a puzzle I’ve been wracking my brain over. My mom calls and mentions the perfect solution to that niggling problem. I’m telling you, it happens all the time when I go to God first.

Years ago, when I was working at Dairy Queen, I left my planner in the bathroom. It had all my wedding plans laid out—which included the blank page with the word, “Cake: ?” A lady walked up to the DQ counter after the lunch rush and asked, “Who’s getting married soon?” She waved my planner in the air, I walked over to thank her for finding it, and guess what she said.

“I do cakes, and my prices are reasonable.”

Need a cake decorator anyone? Ha! Not only were her prices reasonable, I got the decoration of my dreams! No DQ ice cream on a stick for my guests. Coincidence? Yes. A lovely, lovely coincidence created by God especially for me.

I ask Realm for help.

He specializes in process design, after all. I’m amazed at how he can simplify the problem and address the big picture. I told him my plans for the library this year. His eyes gleamed. He gave me a method to break down the job into manageable steps. The steps all begin with ‘S.’ If alliteration is involved, you know it’s good. 😉

Finding someone to bounce my ideas off of always helps me! Most of the time I go to Realm. Sometimes I need a family member or a close friend to give me direction.

I set a due date.

It’s hard to grow a gigantic plan when it has to be done by Tuesday. When I see that day looming on the calendar, my mind leaps from possibility to practicality. The elaborate system I’m concocting will have to wait.

I don’t consult Pinterest.

Someone once said, “Pinterest is like crack for the creative types. You begin to spiral out of control, stealing tissue sheets out of gift bags and repurposing toilet paper rolls for wall art.”

Okay, maybe I said that.

What are your suggestions for an easily-distracted creative soul?