Life: A Lasting Impression

Should first impressions be called ‘impressions’? Aren’t they more like labels or stamps? People talk about how the most beautiful people they’ve ever known seemed rather plain or even ugly at first. Or how someone’s beauty faded once the ugly mind behind the dazzling looks surfaced.

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Photo by Keriography. Used by permission.

What about the first impression the world makes on us? Babies are born into it screaming and flailing, not knowing what to expect. We all forget those first moments – again, not much of an impression.

In the teenage years, the world morphs into a network of emotional pressures and unspoken behaviors that sends us into a tailspin. I remember wanting to lock myself in my room and stay there…for the rest of my life. But, over time, the beauty underneath the crazy, equilibrium-shattering mess unfolded.

There’s something incredibly alive and regenerative hidden under the scars and disasters of our world, our experiences, and our lives. The older I get the more I understand why it’s a blessing to live a long life, to let living make a lasting impression instead of a knee-jerk reaction to the ugliness.

And there is ugliness. It’s not negative to admit it. How can I reach for and focus on the beautiful things if I refuse to admit there are ugly things in life, things I want to get away from so I can thrive? So I can live.

The series I’m working on, Breathing Life, sparked some of these thoughts. The first post in the series is coming next week. I hope you’ll join me in rediscovering Adam’s world.

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Author: Rilla Z

I'm a scribbler. I write about this world, the worlds inside my head, and the world to come.

4 thoughts on “Life: A Lasting Impression”

  1. I agree so much about it not being negative to admit that there is ugliness in this world. For some reason people seem reticent to admit such, as if saying so makes them ugly. I figure that I can only know the scope of beauty if I acknowledge its opposite.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes! I can focus on appreciation and regard for beauty when I’m not hindered by knowing what I can’t say. (A culture of habit-induced positivity can squelch the real thing.) Thanks, Ally!

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